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ACUPUNCTURE - MEDICAL

WHAT IS IT?

Medical Acupuncture involves the insertion of fine, sterile needles: applying knowledge of anatomy, physiology and pathology, and the principles of evidence based medicine.  While Western medical acupuncture is an adaptation and had evolved from Chinese acupuncture, its practitioners no longer adhere to concepts such as Yin/Yang and circulation of qi (pronounced Ch'i), and regard acupuncture as part of modern medicine rather that a complete "alternative medical system".  Effects of Medical acupuncture on pain can be best explained by pain control theories.
Endogenous opiate release theory suggests that the needling stimulates the central and peripheral nervous system leading to release of Serotonins, Endorphins and Encephalins (internal opiates) and the pain gate theory states that if a neuron is bombarded with too many 'pain signals' at once due to stimulation by the Acupuncture needle, it closes down, like closing a gate and produces an analgesic effect.
Another concept that requires understanding is the study of trigger points which are myo-fascial points on the body that are tender when pressed and may give rise to referred pain and other remote effects.   The existence of trigger points has been medically proven, and may result from the misuse or over-extenuation of a muscle.  Acupuncture is often used to relive pain associated with these points, as well as medical procedures such as local anaesthetic and corticosteroid injections.



WHAT CAN I EXPECT FROM MY TREATMENT?

Acupuncture points are located in all areas of the body.  Sometimes the appropriate points are far removed from the area of your pain.  Your acupuncture practitioner will tell you the general location of the planned treatment and if articles of clothing need to be removed.

Needle Insertion.  Acupuncture needles are very thin, so insertion usually causes very little discomfort.  You may feel a deep, aching sensation when a needle reaches the correct depth.
Needle manipulation. Your practitioner may  gently move or twirl the needles after they have been placed.  Another option is to apply heat or mild electrical pulses to the needle.
Needle removal. In most cases, the needles will remain in place for 10 - 20 minutes while you lie still and relax.  There is usually no sensation of discomfort when the needles are removed.  Your acupuncture practitioner should discard the needles after removal - reusable needles can spread infection.

After Acupuncture

Some people feel realxed while others feel energized after an acupuncture treatment.  Side effects are occasional and mild and may include the following symptoms: light-headeness, sleepiness, euphoria, slight nausea, mild bruising and residual muscle aching.  Any of these should only last a short time.  It is helpful to take a short nap after acupuncture.  But  not everyone responds to acu[uncture.  If your symptoms don't begin to improve within a few weeks, acupuncture may not be the right treatment for you. 



WHAT IS IT USEFUL FOR?

It is mainly used to treat musculoskeletal pain, Cervicogenic headaches, myo-fascial trigger point pain, sports injuries, arthritic and rheumatic pain and is also effective for post-operative pain and nausea.

 

HOW LONG IS A SESSION AND WHAT DOES IT COST?

Initial session up to 1 hour subsequent sessions 30 minutes.  Please contact Loddon Mill for current prices on 01508 520522

 

YOUR THERAPIST  

CAROLINE ARULCECEILY  -  Please see Physiotherapy for Caroline's qualifications

 

 

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